State Cannabis Laws

Washington State Marijuana Laws
Background Washington Marijuana Legalization and Regulation, Initiative 502 (I-502)
Washington became one of the first states to legalize marijuana for recreational use in 2012. On November 6, 2012 State legalized the recreational use, retail sale and taxation of marijuana. The proposed measure legalized the production, possession, delivery and distribution of marijuana. The initiative regulated the sale of small amounts of marijuana to people 21 and older.
Washington Rev. Code § 69.50.204
Personal Use of Marijuana
The person who is 21 years or old can possess in private, up to one ounce of cannabis for personal use and up to 16 ounces of marijuana-infused product in solid form, and 72 ounces of marijuana-infused product in liquid form and 7 grams of marijuana concentrate.
Distribution
Possession with intent to distribute any amount of marijuana is a class C felony punishable by up to 5 years imprisonment and/or a fine up to $10,000. Additional mandatory fines: $1,000 for the first offense and $2,000 for a second or subsequent offense.
Sale
Marijuana can only be sold and purchased at state-licensed retail stores. A valid photo ID is required, and no one under 21 is allowed on the retail premises.
Unauthorized Sale or distribution of any amount of marijuana is a C felony punishable by up to 5 years imprisonment and/or a fine up to $10,000. Additional fine: $1,000 for first offenses and $2,000 fine to second or subsequent offenses.
Cultivation
Cultivation is prohibited either for personal use or distribution. It is illegal to grow your own marijuana unless you are an authorized medical patient.  It is a class C felony punishable by up to 5 years imprisonment and/or a fine up to $10,000. 
Limitation
1. Public consumption: The public consumption of marijuana is prohibited and will be treated as civil violation.
2. DUI: It is illegal to drive a vehicle or operate a boat under the influence of marijuana. Traffic safety laws further require that the possession of cannabis in a moving vehicle must be located in a sealed container in either the trunk, glove compartment, or some other area that is inaccessible to the driver or passengers. THC is the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana. Similar to the 0.08 blood-alcohol limit, it is illegal to drive with 5 ng/ml of THC or more in your blood if you are 21 or older. If you are under 21, it is illegal to drive with any amount of THC in your blood. THC concentration is determined by a blood test which is performed at a police station or medical facility and requires a blood draw. Be advised that you can still be cited for DUI under 5 ng/ml if you are displaying signs of impairment. It is less risky to wait at least 6 hours or longer before operating a vehicle. Keep in mind that edible marijuana products can remain in your system much longer.
3. Prohibited Areas: within schools; within 1,000 feet of school grounds, within school buses; within 1000 feet of a school bus stop; within public parks; within public housing projects designated drug free zones; within -public transit vehicles, at a public transit stop center; within civic centers designated drug free zones; within 1,000ft of any civic center designated a drug free zone.
4. Advertisement of paraphernalia: is a misdemeanor punishable by a mandatory minimum of 24 hours and maximum of 90 days in jail and a fine of not more than $1,000.
5. Providing or selling marijuana to a minor: under the age of 18 can result in up to 10 years in prison and up to a $10,000 fine.
6. Travel: It is illegal to take marijuana outside of Washington.
7. Hotels: As with tobacco, smoking marijuana in any indoor location is subject to the restrictions in the Washington Smoking in Public Places Law (RCW 70.160). The law prohibits smoking in a public place or place of employment. If the establishment permits it and you are either vaporizing or staying in a room in which smoking is allowed, it is legal to consume marijuana in a private hotel room.
Penalties
1. Possession of one ounce to 40 grams is a misdemeanor, punishable by a mandatory minimum of 24 hours and maximum of 90 days in jail. A mandatory fine of $250 will be imposed for the first offense, and a mandatory fine of $500 will be imposed for the second or subsequent violations. 
2. Possession of more than 40 grams is a class C felony punishable by up to 5 years imprisonment and/or a fine up to $10,000. An additional mandatory $1,000 fine applies to first time offenses and a $2,000 fine to second or subsequent offenses.

Marijuana remains illegal under federal law: Federal authorities may enforce federal law anywhere within Washington. They especially may choose to do so on federal property (including national parks and forests, federal buildings, and military bases); on navigable waters; and at or near the Canadian border, the coast, airports, and seaports. Federal authorities may choose to seize marijuana. They also may choose to pursue federal criminal prosecution, particularly in situations involving the presence of firearms, minors acquiring marijuana, interstate transport, and/or large quantities of marijuana.

Oregon State Marijuana Laws
Legal Age to Use Recreational Marijuana –Oregon Ballot Measure 91
Oregon Ballot Measure 91 was a 2014 ballot measure in the U.S. state of Oregon. Measure 91 was the third initiative seeking to legalize marijuana for recreational use in Oregon. As per measure 91 “You” can possess, use and buy recreational marijuana if you are 21 and older. If you are younger, it’s illegal. Recreational users of legal age may purchase seeds, immature marijuana plants, cannabinoid products, and useable marijuana from licensed OLCC retailers and are allowed 4 marijuana plants per household. Recreational marijuana cannot be used in public, even by those of legal age. Employers and landlords retain the right to restrict use, even by those of legal age.
Where to Use
Adults 21 and older can use recreational marijuana at home or on private property. You can’t use recreational marijuana in public places. Public places are places to which the general public has access. This includes, but is not limited to: common areas in apartments and hotels; highways and streets; schools; parks and playgrounds; premises used for public passenger transportation (such as bus stops); and amusement parks. Thumb Rule: If someone outside of your home can see you, you’re probably in public.
Bars and restaurants: OLCC rules prohibit any marijuana consumption at a premise with a liquor license. Allowing marijuana use may put an establishment’s liquor license in jeopardy. In addition, smoking and vaping in most businesses is limited by the Indoor Clean Air Act.
How to get Recreational Marijuana
Adults 21 and older can purchase recreational marijuana from an OLCC licensed retail establishments, share or give away recreational marijuana, or grow their own (up to 4 plants per household). But there are limits.
Purchasing limits:
Recreational users of legal age may purchase seeds, immature marijuana plants, cannabinoid products, and useable marijuana from OLCC licensed retailer. A retailer may not sell more than the following amounts to a customer at any one time or within one day:
1 ounce usable marijuana (dried leaves and flowers)
24 ounces of usable marijuana to OMMP cardholders and designated primary caregivers
5 grams cannabinoid extracts or concentrates
16 ounces cannabinoid product in solid form
72 ounces cannabinoid product in liquid form
10 marijuana seeds
4 immature plants
Growing limits for recreational users:
If you’re 21 and older, you can grow up to 4 plants. (If you do not own your home, be sure to check with your landlord regarding their rules about using marijuana, growing marijuana, or making goods containing marijuana in their home or property.)
Gifting limits:
Gifting of recreational marijuana to adults 21 and older is allowed, so long as the amount gifted falls within the personal possession limits and no financial consideration is associated with the transfer. Financial consideration includes: cover charges, admission, donations, tip jars, raffles, fundraiser events, purchase required, barter or sales. It is considered the same as selling marijuana when money, goods or services are exchanged directly or indirectly for marijuana. Gifting of extracts purchased from a licensed retailer is allowed, but not homemade extracts (as homemade extracts are not allowed under personal possession laws).
Personal Possession limits:
There are limits to the amount of marijuana and marijuana products that adults 21 and older may possess at any one time.
PUBLIC possession limits: Recreational users of legal age may possess the following amount of marijuana and marijuana products while in public:
1 ounce usable marijuana (dried leaves and flowers)
1 ounce cannabinoid extracts or concentrates (must be purchased from a licensed marijuana retailer)
16 ounces cannabinoid product in solid form
72 ounces cannabinoid product in liquid form
10 marijuana seeds; AND
4 immature marijuana plants.
PRIVATE possession limits: Recreational users of legal age may possess the following amount of marijuana and marijuana products on private property:
8 ounces usable marijuana (dried leaves and flowers)
1 ounce cannabinoid extracts or concentrates (must be purchased from a licensed marijuana retailer)
16 ounces cannabinoid product in solid form
72 ounces cannabinoid product in liquid form
10 marijuana seeds; AND
4 marijuana plants
Additional restrictions to consider: Landlords possess the right to restrict the use and growth of marijuana on their property. Check with your landlord regarding their rules about using marijuana, growing marijuana, or making goods containing marijuana in their home or property.
The use, growing, transportation and possession of marijuana on federal property (including Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management and National Park Service land) remains prohibited.
DUI: Driving under the influence of marijuana remains illegal. Driving under the influence of intoxicants (DUII) refers to operating a motor vehicle while intoxicated or drugged, including impairment from the use of marijuana.
Travel
You can’t buy marijuana in another state and bring it into Oregon, nor can you take it from Oregon across state lines. That includes to and from Washington and California where recreational marijuana is also legal. Taking marijuana across state lines is a federal offense.
Driving within the state of Oregon
If you are 21 or older, you may drive with marijuana in your vehicle within the legal possession limits.
Flying within the state of Oregon
The Portland International Airport does allow airline passengers flying within the state to board with the legal public possession amount (1 ounce) of marijuana on them. However, smoking marijuana onboard the plane is strictly prohibited. If the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) finds marijuana on a passenger, they’ll notify airport police, who will confirm that the passenger is not exceeding the 1 ounce legal limit for public possession, the passenger’s age, and the boarding pass destination to make sure they are flying to a destination within the state. Travelers who are traveling outside of the state will be asked to dispose of the marijuana before being allowed to carry on with their travel plans.
Still illegal on federal land
The use, growing, transportation and possession of marijuana on federal property (including Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management and National Park Service land) is prohibited.
Tribal land is sovereign and rules may be different
Federally recognized Indian Reservations possess the right to enter into agreements with the State of Oregon to grow and sell marijuana on their reservations, but they may also disallow possession and use on their sovereign land.

Nevada State Marijuana Laws
Background
Chapter 453 of the Nevada Revised Statutes, known as the Uniform Controlled Substances Act, concerns the classification, enforcement, regulation, and offenses related to marijuana. This ballot measure amended the Nevada Revised Statutes to make it lawful for a person 21 years of age or older to purchase and consume one ounce or less of marijuana other than concentrated marijuana, or one-eighth of an ounce or less of concentrated marijuana. It would also make it lawful for a person 21 years of age or older to cultivate not more than six marijuana plants for personal use, as well as obtain and use marijuana paraphernalia.
Legal Age to Use Recreational Marijuana –Ballot Question 2(2016
As per Question 2 “You” can possess, use and buy recreational marijuana if you are 21 and older. If you are younger, with a valid medical marijuana card you can purchase cannabis legally in Nevada, even if the card has been issued from another state. Minors are also eligible for a medical card if a parent or guardian signs the Minor Release Form and agrees to act as the child's primary caregiver.
Personal use and cultivation of marijuana [Section 6]
Recreational consumers 21 years or older are allowed to:
Purchase up to 1 ounce of cannabis flower or up to 1/8 of an ounce of concentrate at one time.
Possess, cultivate, process, or transport not more than six marijuana plants for personal use and possess the marijuana produced by the plants on the premises where the plants were grown, provided that:
Cultivation takes place within a closet, room, greenhouse, or other enclosed area that is equipped with a lock or other security device that allows access only to persons authorized to access the area; and No more than 12 plants are possessed, cultivated, or processed at a single residence, or upon the grounds of that residence, at one time; Give or otherwise deliver one ounce or less of marijuana, other than concentrated marijuana, or one-eighth of an ounce or less of concentrated marijuana without remuneration to a person provided that the transaction is not advertised or promoted to the public; or
Assist another person who is 21 years of age or older in any of the acts described in this section.
How to get Marijuana
You can purchase marijuana from an establishment licensed by STATE OF NEVADA
Section 4 Limitations
This Statue
1. Does not permit any person to engage in and do not prevent the imposition of any civil, criminal, or other penalty for:
Driving, operating, or being in actual physical control of a vehicle, aircraft, or vessel under power or sail while under the influence of marijuana or while impaired by marijuana;
Knowingly delivering, giving, selling, administering, or offering to sell, administer, give, or deliver marijuana to a person under 21 years of age, unless:
The recipient is permitted to possess marijuana pursuant to chapter 453A of NRS; or
The person demanded and was shown bona fide documentary evidence of the majority and identity of the recipient issued by a federal, state, county, or municipal government, or subdivision or agency thereof;
Possession or use of marijuana or marijuana paraphernalia on the grounds of, or within, any facility or institution under the jurisdiction of the Nevada Department of Corrections;
Possession or use of marijuana on the grounds of, or within, a school providing instruction in preschool, kindergarten, or any grades 1 through 12; or
Undertaking any task under the influence of marijuana that constitutes negligence or professional malpractice.
2. Does not prohibit:
A public or private employer from maintaining, enacting, and enforcing a workplace policy prohibiting or restricting actions or conduct otherwise permitted under this statue;
A state or local government agency that occupies, owns, or controls a building from prohibiting or otherwise restricting the consumption, cultivation, processing, manufacture, sale, delivery, or transfer of marijuana in that building;
A person who occupies, owns, or controls a privately owned property from prohibiting or otherwise restricting the smoking, cultivation, processing, manufacture, sale, delivery, or transfer of marijuana on that property; or
A locality from adopting and enforcing local marijuana control measures pertaining to zoning and land use for marijuana establishments.
Section 7: Notwithstanding any other provision of Nevada law and the law of any political subdivision of Nevada, it is not unlawful and shall not be an offense or be a basis for seizure or forfeiture of assets for persons 21 years of age or older to manufacture, possess, use, transport, or purchase marijuana paraphernalia, or to distribute or sell marijuana paraphernalia to a person who is 21 years of age or older.
Section 14 Penalties
Restrictions on personal cultivation.
(a) Except as otherwise provided in chapter 453A of NRS, any person who:
(1) Cultivates marijuana within 25 miles of a retail marijuana store licensed pursuant to sections 1 to 18, inclusive, of this act, unless the person is a marijuana cultivation facility or a person acting in his or her capacity as an agent of a marijuana cultivation facility;
(2) Cultivates marijuana plants where they are visible from a public place by normal unaided vision; or
(3) Cultivates marijuana on property not in the cultivator’s lawful possession or without the consent of the person in lawful physical possession of the property;
(b) Is guilty of:
(1) For a first violation, a misdemeanor punished by a fine of not more than $600.
(2) For a second violation, a misdemeanor punished by a fine of not more than $1,000.
(3) For a third violation, a gross misdemeanor.
(4) For a fourth or subsequent violation, a category E felony.
2. A person who smokes or otherwise consumes marijuana in a public place, in a retail marijuana store, or in a moving vehicle is guilty of a misdemeanor punished by a fine of not more than $600.
3. A person under 21 years of age who falsely represents himself or herself to be 21 years of age or older to obtain marijuana is guilty of a misdemeanor.
4. A person under 21 years of age who knowingly enter, loiters, or remains on the premises of a marijuana establishment shall be punished by a fine of not more than $500 unless the person is authorized to possess marijuana pursuant to chapter 453A of NRS and the marijuana establishment is a dual licensee.
5. A person who manufactures marijuana by chemical extraction or chemical synthesis, unless done pursuant to a marijuana product manufacturing license issued by the Department or authorized by chapter 453A of NRS, is guilty of a category E felony.
6. A person who knowingly gives marijuana to any person under 21 years of age, or who knowingly leaves or deposits any marijuana in any place with the intent that it will be procured by any person under 21 years of age is guilty of a misdemeanor.
7. A person who knowingly gives marijuana to any person under 18 years of age, or who knowingly leaves or deposits any marijuana in any place with the intent that it will be procured by any person under 18 years of age is guilty of a gross misdemeanor.
8. Notwithstanding the provisions of sections 1 to 18, inclusive, of this act, after the effective date of this act, the legislature may amend provisions of this act to provide for the conditions in which a locality may permit consumption of marijuana in a retail marijuana store.

Massachusetts State Marijuana Laws
Background
Ballot Question 4 was passed in the November 2016 elections, officially legalizing marijuana for recreational use for individuals 21 years of age or older. The law goes into effect on December 15, 2016 which means adults 21 years of age and older will be able to possess up to one ounce (1 oz) of marijuana outside of their residence and up to ten ounces of marijuana inside their residence.
On December 28, 2016, the Massachusetts State Legislature voted to delay the date that marijuana sales would begin by six months. Question 4 set the date for licensing cannabis shops to begin on January 1, 2018. However, legislators voted to move the date to July 1, 2018. Senate President Stanley Rosenberg (D) said, "The legislature has a responsibility to implement the will of the voters while also protecting public health and public safety. This short delay will allow the necessary time for the Legislature to work with stakeholders on improving the new law."
Purpose
Marijuana legalization took effect on December 15, 2016. Ballot Question 4 legalized and created a commission to regulate marijuana in Massachusetts. Under the new law, individuals at least 21 years old would be able to use it, grow it, and possess it. The measure stipulated that individuals could possess under 10 ounces of marijuana inside their homes and under 1 ounce in public, also allowing them to grow up to six marijuana plants in their homes. The measure created a regulatory structure called the Cannabis Control Commission intended to oversee marijuana legalization and issue licenses to firms that seek to sell marijuana products.
Growing and possession: People of 21 years and older can:
Use and keep possession of up to 1 ounce of marijuana in public.
Use and keep possession of up to 10 ounces of marijuana in the home.
Giving up to 1 ounce of marijuana to another person 21 years of age or older for free and without public advertisement.
Growing up to 6 marijuana plants at home per person, and up to 12 marijuana plants per household.
“Landlords prohibiting tenants from being allowed to grow marijuana.”
Chapter 94G, Section 7 Personal use of marijuana
Notwithstanding any other general or special law to the contrary, except as otherwise provided in this chapter, a person 21 years of age or older shall not be arrested, prosecuted, penalized, sanctioned or disqualified under the laws of the commonwealth in any manner, or denied any right or privilege and shall not be subject to seizure or forfeiture of assets for:
possessing, using, purchasing, processing or manufacturing 1 ounce or less of marijuana, except that not more than 5 grams of marijuana may be in the form of marijuana concentrate;
within the person's primary residence, possessing up to 10 ounces of marijuana and any marijuana produced by marijuana plants cultivated on the premises and possessing, cultivating or processing not more than 6 marijuana plants for personal use so long as not more than 12 plants are cultivated on the premises at once;
assisting another person who is 21 years of age or older in any of the acts described in this section; or
giving away or otherwise transferring without remuneration up to 1 ounce of marijuana, except that not more than 5 grams of marijuana may be in the form of marijuana concentrate, to a person 21 years of age or older, as long as the transfer is not advertised or promoted to the public.
Notwithstanding any other general or special law to the contrary, except as otherwise provided in this chapter, if the import or export of marijuana to or from the commonwealth is not prohibited by federal law, a person 21 years of age or older shall not be arrested, prosecuted, penalized, sanctioned or disqualified under the laws of the commonwealth in any manner, or denied any right or privilege and shall not be subject to seizure or forfeiture of assets for possessing, using, purchasing, cultivating, processing or manufacturing any amount of marijuana or marijuana products for personal use.
Notwithstanding any other general or special law to the contrary, except as otherwise provided in this chapter, a person shall not be arrested, prosecuted, penalized, sanctioned or otherwise denied any benefit and shall not be subject to seizure or forfeiture of assets for allowing property the person owns, occupies or manages to be used for any of the activities conducted lawfully under this chapter or for enrolling or employing a person who engages in marijuana-related activities lawfully under this chapter.
Absent clear, convincing and articulable evidence that the person's actions related to marijuana have created an unreasonable danger to the safety of a minor child, neither the presence of cannabinoid components or metabolites in a person's bodily fluids nor conduct permitted under this chapter related to the possession, consumption, transfer, cultivation, manufacture or sale of marijuana, marijuana products or marijuana accessories by a person charged with the well-being of a child shall form the sole or primary basis for substantiation, service plans, removal or termination or for denial of custody, visitation or any other parental right or responsibility.
The use of marijuana shall not disqualify a person from any needed medical procedure or treatment, including organ and tissue transplants.
Notwithstanding any general or special law to the contrary, except as otherwise provided in this chapter, a person 21 years of age or older shall not be arrested, prosecuted, penalized, sanctioned or disqualified and is not subject to seizure or forfeiture of assets for possessing, producing, processing, manufacturing, purchasing, obtaining, selling or otherwise transferring or delivering hemp.
For the purposes of this section, "marijuana concentrate'' shall mean the resin extracted from any part of the plant of the genus Cannabis and every compound, manufacture, salt, derivative, mixture or preparation of that resin but shall not include the weight of any other ingredient combined with marijuana to prepare marijuana products.
Section 8. Marijuana accessories authorized: Notwithstanding any general or special law to the contrary, except as otherwise provided in this chapter, a person 21 years of age or older shall not be arrested, prosecuted, penalized, sanctioned or disqualified and shall not be subject to seizure or forfeiture of assets for possessing, purchasing or otherwise obtaining or manufacturing marijuana accessories or for selling or otherwise transferring marijuana accessories to a person who is 21 years of age or older.
Section 13. Penalties
Restrictions on personal cultivation. No person shall cultivate or process marijuana plants pursuant to section 8 of this chapter if the plants are visible from a public place without the use of binoculars, aircraft or other optical aids or cultivate or process marijuana plants outside of an area that is equipped with a lock or other security device. A person who violates this subsection shall be punished by a civil penalty of not more than $300 and forfeiture of the marijuana, but shall not be subject to any other form of criminal or civil punishment or disqualification solely for this conduct.
Restrictions on personal possession. No person shall possess more than 1 ounce of marijuana or marijuana products within the person's place of residence pursuant to section 8 of this chapter unless the marijuana and marijuana products are secured by a lock. A person who violates this subsection shall be punished by a civil penalty of not more than $100 and forfeiture of the marijuana.
Restrictions on public consumption of marijuana. No person shall consume marijuana in a public place or smoke marijuana where smoking tobacco is prohibited. A person who violates this subsection shall be punished by a civil penalty of not more than $100. This subsection shall not apply to a person who consumes marijuana or marijuana products in a designated area of a marijuana establishment located in a city or town that has voted to allow consumption on the premises where sold and shall not be construed to limit the medical use of marijuana.
Possession of marijuana in motor vehicles. No person shall, upon any way or in any place to which the public has a right of access, or upon any way or in any place to which members of the public have access as invitees or licensees, possess an open container of marijuana or marijuana products in the passenger area of any motor vehicle. A person who violates this subjection shall be punished by a civil penalty of not more than $500. For purposes of this section, "open container'' shall mean that the package containing marijuana or marijuana products has its seal broken or from which the contents have been partially removed or consumed and "passenger area'' shall mean the area designed to seat the driver and passengers while the motor vehicle is in operation and any area that is readily accessible to the driver or passenger while in a seated position; provided however that the passenger area shall not include a motor vehicle's trunk, locked glove compartment or the living quarters of a house coach or house trailer, or if a motor vehicle is not equipped with a trunk, the area behind the last upright seat or an area not normally occupied by the driver or passenger.
Possession or cultivation of excess marijuana. Notwithstanding chapter 94C of the General Laws and until the import or export of marijuana to or from the commonwealth is not prohibited by federal law, a person who is at least 21 years of age and who cultivates more than 6 but not more than 12 marijuana plants or who possesses an amount of marijuana outside of his or her place of residence having a weight of more than 1 ounce but not more than 2 ounces shall be subject only to a civil penalty of not more than $100 and forfeiture of the marijuana not allowed by section 8 of this chapter, but shall not be subject to any other form of criminal or civil punishment or disqualification solely for this conduct.
Procurement of marijuana by a person under 21 years of age. A person under 21 years of age, except a qualifying patient holding a valid registration card for the medical use of marijuana, who purchases or attempts to purchase marijuana, marijuana products or marijuana accessories, or makes arrangements with any person to purchase or in any way procure marijuana, marijuana products or marijuana accessories, or who willfully misrepresents such person's age, or in any way alters, defaces or otherwise falsifies identification offered as proof of age, with the intent of purchasing marijuana, marijuana products or marijuana accessories, shall be punished by a civil penalty of not more than $100 and shall complete a drug awareness program established pursuant to section 32M of chapter 94C of the General Laws. The parents or legal guardian of any offender under the age of 18 shall be notified in accordance with section 32N of chapter 94C of the General Laws and the failure within 1 year of the offense of such an offender to complete a drug awareness program may be a basis for delinquency proceedings for persons under the age of 17 at the time of the person's offense.
Enforcement. Civil penalties imposed pursuant to this section shall be enforced by utilizing the non-criminal disposition procedures provided in section 32N of chapter 94C of the General Laws.
Legal Summary of Ballot Question 4:
“The proceeds of retail sales of marijuana and marijuana products would be subject to the state sales tax and an additional excise tax of 3.75%. A city or town could impose a separate tax of up to 2%. Revenue received from the additional state excise tax or from license application fees and civil penalties for violations of this law would be deposited in a Marijuana Regulation Fund and would be used subject to appropriation for administration of the proposed law. Marijuana-related activities authorized under this proposed law could not be a basis for adverse orders in child welfare cases absent clear and convincing evidence that such activities had created an unreasonable danger to the safety of a minor child. The proposed law would not affect existing law regarding medical marijuana treatment centers or the operation of motor vehicles while under the influence. It would permit property owners to prohibit the use, sale, or production of marijuana on their premises (with an exception that landlords cannot prohibit consumption by tenants of marijuana by means other than by smoking); and would permit employers to prohibit the consumption of marijuana by employees in the workplace. State and local governments could continue to restrict uses in public buildings or at or near schools. Supplying marijuana to persons under age 21 would be unlawful.”

Maine State Marijuana Laws
Background
On November 8, 2016 Maine voters approved Question 1 and joined eight other states to have legalized the recreational use, retail sale and taxation of marijuana. Following a recount and certification of election results the law was enacted as IB 2015.
This citizen-initiated legislation would repeal the existing state law that makes it a civil violation to possess up to 2 ½ ounces of marijuana (broadly defined to include all parts of the Cannabis plant, as well as any resin, compounds, or derivatives), other than for medical use by a qualifying patient. It would make it permissible under state law for a person 21 years of age or older to possess, grow, cultivate, process, transfer or purchase up to certain specified amounts of marijuana. (These activities would still be prohibited by federal law.) The initiative would establish a system of state regulation and licensing of the cultivation, manufacture, distribution, testing and retail sale of marijuana and marijuana products, and would authorize municipal regulation as described below.
Personal use of Marijuana: The initiative would allow any person 21 years of age or older to:
use, possess, or transport up to 2½ ounces of prepared marijuana;
transfer or furnish to another person who is 21 years of age or older, without payment of any kind, up to 2½ ounces of marijuana and up to 6 immature marijuana plants or seedlings;
possess, grow, cultivate, process or transport up to 6 flowering marijuana plants, 12 immature plants and an unlimited number of seedlings, and possess all the marijuana produced by these plants at the person’s residence;
purchase up to 2½ ounces of retail marijuana from a retail marijuana store;
purchase up to 12 seedlings or immature plants from a retail marijuana cultivation facility;
cultivate up to 6 flowering plants at the person’s residence, or on property the person owns or has written permission to use for this purpose; and
Consume marijuana in a nonpublic place, including a private residence.
The term “nonpublic place” is not defined in the bill. The initiated bill does not repeal state criminal laws relating to marijuana but provides that personal use and other activities specifically authorized in the bill are nevertheless legal. Cultivation of marijuana for medical use would continue to be regulated under the existing medical marijuana law. Existing laws that restrict where people may smoke tobacco would also apply to smoking marijuana, though not to ingestion of marijuana and marijuana products by other means.
Legible tag on each marijuana plant. A person 21-years of age or older must have a legible tag on each marijuana plant. The tag must include at least the person's name and Maine driver's license number or Maine identification number.
Prohibited Acts. A person may not (i) consume retail marijuana products in a retail marijuana establishment. A retail marijuana establishment may not allow retail marijuana or retail marijuana products to be consumed upon its licensed premises or (ii) Buy, sell, transfer, give away or acquire retail marijuana or retail marijuana products.
Person licensed to sell retail marijuana or retail marijuana products.
A person licensed to sell retail marijuana or retail marijuana products may not:
Display any signs that are inconsistent with local laws or regulations;
Use advertising material that is misleading, deceptive or false, or that is designed to appeal to a person under 21 years of age;
Have in that person's possession or upon the licensed premises any marijuana the sale of which is not permitted by the license;
Sell retail marijuana or retail marijuana products to a person under 21 years of age without checking the person's identification;
Except for a retail marijuana social club licensee, have on the licensed premises any retail marijuana, retail marijuana products or marijuana paraphernalia that shows evidence of the retail marijuana having been consumed or partially consumed; or
Violate the provisions of section 2450 or abandon the licensed premises or otherwise cease operation without notifying the state licensing authority and appropriate municipality at least 48 hours in advance and without accounting for and forfeiting to the state licensing authority for destruction all marijuana and products containing marijuana.

Colorado State Marijuana Laws
Amendment 64: Use and Regulation of Marijuana.
The Colorado Amendment 64, which was passed by voters on November 6, 2012, led to legalization in January 2014.
Purpose.
In the interest of the health and public safety of citizenry, state of Colorado further find and declare that marijuana should be regulated in a manner similar to alcohol so that:
Individuals will have to show proof of age before purchasing marijuana;
Selling, distributing, or transferring marijuana to minors and other individuals under the age of 21 shall remain illegal;
Driving under the influence of marijuana shall remain illegal;
Legitimate, taxpaying business people, and not criminal actors, will conduct sales of marijuana; and
Marijuana sold in this state will be labeled and subject to additional regulations to ensure that consumers are informed and protected.
Purchase and sale of Marijuana.
You must be 21 or older to purchase recreational marijuana in Colorado, and you must present a government-issued ID for proof of age. If you are between the ages of 18 and 21 and would like to purchase marijuana, you will need to apply for a medical card (or "red card"*) for medical use of Marijuana. While you do not have to be a resident to buy recreational marijuana, only Colorado residents can acquire a red card. It is illegal to buy marijuana from an unlicensed source. It’s a felony for anyone to give or sell to, or share Marijuana with, anyone under 21.
*Medical marijuana requires a state red card, which can only be obtained by Colorado residents with a recommendation from a doctor that a patient suffers from a debilitating medical condition that may benefit from medical marijuana. Medical marijuana patients can obtain marijuana from a licensed center, a primary caregiver or self-grow.
Limits to buying Marijuana:
Buy retail marijuana only from licensed retail stores.
Adults over the age of 21 can buy and possess up to 1 ounce of marijuana at a time.
Limits to selling Marijuana:
Only licensed retailers can sell marijuana products.
Adults over 21 can give up to 1 ounce of marijuana to another adult 21 or older, but can’t sell marijuana. This includes homegrown product.
Using and having Marijuana.
Where you CAN use: Private property is your best place. However, property owners can ban the use and possession of marijuana on their properties. If you rent, you may not be allowed to use marijuana in your home. Hotel owners can ban the use and possession of marijuana on their properties, so you may not be able to use in a hotel room.
No more than 1 ounce: Adults 21 and older can have up to 1 ounce of marijuana. Having more can result in legal charges and fines.
Public use is illegal: Using marijuana in any way like smoking, eating or vaporizing isn’t allowed in public places. This includes the following outdoor and indoor areas, and many more: Sidewalks, Parks and amusement parks, Ski resorts, Concert venues, Businesses, Restaurants, cafes or bars, Common areas of apartment buildings or condominiums.
Use on federal land is illegal: Since marijuana is still illegal under federal law, you can’t use on federal land, including national parks and national forests. This includes ski slopes.
Drug testing at work: Despite legalization, employers can still test for marijuana and make employment decisions based on drug test results.
DUI: Marijuana may be carried in cars but it may not be in an open container and cannot cross state boundaries. It is illegal to use or consume marijuana in a motor vehicle and it is illegal to drive under the influence of marijuana. Anyone with 5 nano-grams or more of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (known as THC) per milliliter in whole blood (CRS 42-4-1301) while driving can be arrested for DUI. The consequences of DUI are dependent on the driver but can include fines, jail and a revoked license.
Making hash oil.
Don’t use flammables: It’s illegal to make marijuana hash oil or concentrates using substances like butane, propane, ether or alcohol.
Point-of-sale regulations
You must present a valid ID proving you’re at least 21 years old, so be prepared.
No minors allowed: According to the retail marijuana rules passed by the Department of Revenue, no one under 21 is allowed in the restricted portion of a retail store.
Limited hours of sale: Under state rules, retail marijuana businesses can be open only between 8 a.m. and midnight. Municipalities can require stricter hours of operation.
Packaging requirements: Retail and medical marijuana businesses are required to sell all marijuana products in packaging that’s re-sealable, child-resistant and not see-through. The packaging protects children, teens and adults from accidentally eating something that they don’t realize contains marijuana. Using the packaging from the store is an important first step in safe storage.
Labeling requirements: The Department of Revenue requires that all retail marijuana products use the symbol on packaging.
Pregnant Women: Marijuana use during pregnancy is unsafe and may have legal consequences. Some hospitals test babies after birth for drugs. If your baby tests positive for THC at birth, Colorado law requires hospitals to notify child protective services.

California State Marijuana Laws
Background
Proposition 215 Legalized Medical Marijuana.
In 1996, voters approved Proposition 215, which made it legal under state law for individuals of any age to use marijuana in California for medical purposes. Individuals must have a recommendation from a doctor to use medical marijuana. In 2003, the Legislature legalized medical marijuana collectives, which are nonprofit organizations that grow and provide marijuana to their members. Collectives are not now licensed or regulated by the state, but cities and counties can regulate where and how medical marijuana is grown and sold by individuals or collectives.
Proposition 64 the Control, Regulate and Tax Adult Use of Marijuana Act.
Currently in California, nonmedical marijuana use is unregulated, untaxed, and occurs without any consumer or environmental protections. The Control, Regulate and Tax Adult Use of Marijuana Act will legalize marijuana for those over 21 years old, protect children, and establish laws to regulate marijuana cultivation, distribution, sale and use, and will protect Californians and the environment from potential dangers. It establishes the Bureau of Marijuana Control within the Department of Consumer Affairs to regulate and license the marijuana industry.
It is an initiative which will legalize marijuana for individuals over the age of 21. The initiative would authorize possession of up to one ounce of marijuana and the cultivation of up to six marijuana plants per single household residence. The initiative prohibits advertising to minors and requires that packaging and labeling follow standards specific to marijuana products. The initiative would change the penalty for possession by a minor to mandatory drug counseling and community service and the penalty for selling marijuana without a license to up to six months in jail and/or up to a $500 fine.
Purchasing Marijuana.
Under the measure, adults age 21 and over would be able to purchase marijuana at state-licensed businesses or through their delivery services. Businesses could generally not be located within 1000 feet of a school, day care center, or youth center, unless allowed by a local government. In addition, businesses selling marijuana could not sell tobacco or alcohol. Under the measure, local governments could authorize licensed businesses to allow on-site consumption of marijuana. However, such businesses could not allow consumption in areas within the presence or sight of individuals under the age of 21 or areas visible from a public place. In addition, businesses allowing on-site marijuana consumption could not allow consumption of alcohol or tobacco.
Proposition 64 Legalizes Nonmedical Marijuana Activities with Restrictions.
Smoking Marijuana.
Activities Allowed. Smoking Marijuana in a private home or at a business licensed for on-site marijuana consumption.
Activities Not Allowed. Smoking marijuana while driving a car or in any public place or anywhere that smoking tobacco is prohibited.
Possessing Marijuana for Personal Use.
Activities Allowed. Possession of up to 28.5 grams (equivalent to 1 oz) of marijuana and up-to 8 grams of concentrated Marijuana (Such as hash).
Activities Not Allowed. Possession of marijuana on the grounds of a school, day care center, or youth center while children are present.
Growing Marijuana.
Activities Allowed. Growing up-to 6 marijuana plants and keeping the marijuana produced by the plants within a private home.
Activities Not Allowed. Growing in an area that is unlocked or visible from a public area.
Giving Away Marijuana.
Activities Allowed. Giving away to other adults’ up-to 28.5 grams of marijuana and up-to 8 grams of concentrated Marijuana.
Activities Not Allowed. Providing Marijuana to minors under the age of 21 for non-medical use.
Penalties.
The measure changes state marijuana penalties. For example, possession of 1 oz or less of marijuana is currently punishable by a $100 fine. Under the measure, such a crime committed by someone under the age of 18 would instead be punishable by a requirement to attend a drug education or counseling program and complete community service. In addition, selling marijuana for nonmedical purposes is currently punishable by up to four years in state prison or county jail.
Under the measure, selling marijuana without a license would be a crime generally punishable by up to six months in county jail and/or a fine of up to $500. In addition, individuals engaging in any marijuana business activity without a license would be subject to a civil penalty of up to three times the amount of the license fee for each violation. While the measure changes penalties for many marijuana-related crimes, the penalties for driving a vehicle while under the impairment of marijuana would remain the same [Vehicle Code 23152(e) VC]. The measure also requires the destruction within two years of criminal records for individuals arrested or convicted for certain marijuana-related offenses.
Individuals Previously Convicted of Marijuana Crimes.
Under the measure, individuals serving sentences for activities that are made legal or are subject to lesser penalties under the measure would be eligible for resentencing. For example, an offender serving a jail or prison term for growing or selling marijuana could have their sentence reduced. (A court would not be required to resentence someone if it determined that the person was likely to commit certain severe crimes.) Qualifying individuals would be resentenced to whatever punishment they would have received under the measure. Resentenced individuals currently in jail or prison would be subject to community supervision (such as probation) for up to 1 year following their release, unless a court removes that requirement. In addition, individuals who have completed sentences for crimes that are reduced by the measure could apply to the courts to have their criminal records changed.

Alaska State Marijuana Laws
Background
In 1975, the state legislature approved a bill to decriminalize private possession of up to one ounce of marijuana in public, thereby replacing the possibility of time in jail with a civil fine of up to $100. The Alaska Supreme Court did away with all penalties for possessing up to four ounces of marijuana and up to 24 plants in one's home, ruling that the prohibition of marijuana possession violated the right to privacy guaranteed in the state constitution.
Then, in 1990, all of this was undone by the approval of the Alaska Marijuana Criminalization Initiative, which made all marijuana possession in Alaska illegal and punishable by up to 90 days in jail and/or up to a $1,000 fine.
Marijuana ballot measures 2012
The 2012 elections proved to be groundbreaking for marijuana legalization support groups. Voters in Washington approved Initiative 502, thereby legalizing the recreational use of marijuana.
Ballot Measure 2
The Alaska Marijuana Legalization, Ballot Measure 2 was on the November 4, 2014 ballot in Alaska as an initiated state statute, where it was approved. As a result of its passage, the measure allowed people age 21 and older to possess up to one ounce of marijuana and up to six plants. It also made the manufacture, sale and possession of marijuana paraphernalia legal. The initiative was designed to implement these changes at the state level; however, these acts still remained illegal under federal law, at the time of the measure's passage.
The Marijuana Control Board created by Measure 2 met for the first time on July 2, 2015. In October 2015, the control board released its full marijuana regulation proposal in a 100-page document. The proposal outlines rules for marijuana packaging, store locations, distribution, edibles, social clubs and more.
Summary
Smoking Marijuana.
Activities Allowed. Smoking Marijuana in a private home or at a business licensed for on-site marijuana consumption.
Activities Not Allowed. Smoking marijuana while driving a car or in any public place or anywhere that smoking tobacco is prohibited.
Marijuana for Personal Use.
Activities Allowed. Possession of up to 1 oz of marijuana. The bill does not intend to prohibit schools, correction facilities, hospitals, or private persons or entities from restricting marijuana on their property.
Growing Marijuana.
Activities Allowed. Growing up-to 6 marijuana plants, includes, keeping 3 mature marijuana plants within a private home at a time.
Activities Not Allowed. Growing in an area that is unlocked or visible from a public area.
Employers, driving, minors and control of property.
Nothing in this chapter is intended to require an employer to permit or accommodate the use, consumption, possession, transfer, display, transportation, sale or growing of marijuana in the workplace or to affect the ability of employers to have policies restricting the use of marijuana by employees.
Nothing in this chapter is intended to allow driving under the influence of marijuana or to supersede laws related to driving under the influence of marijuana.
Nothing in this chapter is intended to permit the transfer of marijuana, with or without remuneration, to a person under the age of 21.
Nothing in this chapter shall prohibit a person, employer, school, hospital, recreation or youth center, correction facility, corporation or any other entity who occupies, owns or controls private property from prohibiting or otherwise regulating the possession, consumption, use, display, transfer, distribution, sale, transportation, or growing of marijuana on or in that property.
Giving Away Marijuana.
Activities Allowed. Giving away to other adults’ up-to 28.5 grams of marijuana.
Activities Not Allowed. Providing Marijuana to minors under the age of 21.
Purpose
In the interest of allowing law enforcement to focus on violent and property crimes, and to enhance individual freedom, the people of the state of Alaska find and declare that the use of marijuana should be legal for persons 21 years of age or older.
In the interest of the health and public safety of our citizenry, the people of the state of Alaska further find and declare that the production and sale of marijuana should be regulated so that:
Individuals will have to show proof of age before purchasing marijuana;
Legitimate, taxpaying business people, and not criminal actors, will conduct sales of marijuana; and
Marijuana sold by regulated businesses will be labeled and subject to additional regulations to ensure that consumers are informed and protected.
The people of the state of Alaska further declare that the provisions of this Act are not intended to diminish the right to privacy as interpreted by the Alaska Supreme Court in Ravin v. State of Alaska.
Nothing in this Act proposes or intends to require any individual or entity to engage in any conduct that violates federal law, or exempt any individual or entity from any requirement of federal law, or pose any obstacle to federal enforcement of federal law.
Personal use of marijuana.
Notwithstanding any other provision of law, except as otherwise provided, the following acts, by persons 21 years of age or older, are lawful and shall not be a criminal or civil offense under Alaska law or the law of any political subdivision of Alaska or be a basis for seizure or forfeiture of assets under Alaska law:
Possessing, using, displaying, purchasing, or transporting marijuana accessories or one ounce or less of marijuana;
Possessing, growing, processing, or transporting no more than six marijuana plants, with three or fewer being mature, flowering plants, and possession of the marijuana produced by the plants on the premises where the plants were grown;
Transferring one ounce or less of marijuana and up to six immature marijuana plants to a person who is 21 years of age or older without remuneration;
Consumption of marijuana, except that nothing in this section shall permit the consumption of marijuana in public; and
Assisting another person who is 21 years of age or older in any of the acts described in paragraphs (a) through (d) of this section.
Restrictions on personal cultivation, penalty.
The personal cultivation of marijuana described in AS 17.38.020(b) is subject to the following terms:
Marijuana plants shall be cultivated in a location where the plants are not subject to public view without the use of binoculars, aircraft, or other optical aids.
A person who cultivates marijuana must take reasonable precautions to ensure the plants are secure from unauthorized access.
Marijuana cultivation may only occur on property lawfully in possession of the cultivator or with the consent of the person in lawful possession of the property.
A person who violates this section while otherwise acting in compliance with AS 17.38.020(b) is guilty of a violation punishable by a fine of up to $750.
Public consumption.
It is illegal to consume marijuana in public. A person who violates this section is guilty of a violation punishable by a fine of up to $100.
False identification, penalty.
A person who is under 21 years of age may not present or offer to a marijuana establishment or the marijuana establishment's agent or employee any written or oral evidence of age that is false, fraudulent or not actually the person's own, for the purpose of:
Purchasing, attempting to purchase or otherwise procuring or attempting to procure marijuana or marijuana products; or
Gaining access to a marijuana establishment.
A person who violates this section is guilty of a violation punishable by a fine of up to $400.
Marijuana accessories authorized.
Notwithstanding any other provision of law, it is lawful and shall not be an offense under Alaska law or the law of any political subdivision of Alaska or be a basis for seizure or forfeiture of assets under Alaska law for persons 21 years of age or older to manufacture, possess, or purchase marijuana accessories, or to distribute or sell marijuana accessories to a person who is 21 years of age or older.